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Tag Archives: AMD

AnandTech | AMD Radeon HD 7790 Review Feat. Sapphire: The First Desktop Sea Islands

AnandTech | AMD Radeon HD 7790 Review Feat. Sapphire: The First Desktop Sea Islands.


In an industry that has long grown accustomed to annual product updates, the video card industry is one where the flip of a calendar to a new year brings a lot of excitement, anticipation, speculation, and maybe even a bit of dread for consumers and manufacturers alike. It’s no secret then that with AMD launching most of their Radeon HD 7000 series parts in Q1 of 2012 that the company would be looking to refresh their product lineup this year. Indeed, they removed doubt before 2012 even came to a close when they laid out their 8000M plans for the first half of 2013, revealing their first 2013 GPU and giving us a mobile roadmap with clear spots for further GPUs. So we have known for months that new GPUs would be on their way; the questions being what would they be and when would they arrive?
The answer to that, as it turns out, is a lot more complex than anyone was expecting. It’s been something of an epic journey getting to AMD’s 2013 GPU launches, and not all for good reasons. A PR attempt to explain that the existing Radeon HD 7000 series parts would not be going away backfired in a big way, with AMD’s calling their existing product stack “stable through 2013” being incorrectly interpreted as their intention to not release any new products in 2013. This in turn lead to AMD going one step further to rectify the problem by publically laying out their 2013 plans in greater (but not complete) detail, which thankfully cleared a lot of confusion. Though not all confusion and doubt has been erased – after all, AMD has to save something for the GPU introductions – we learned that AMD would be launching new retail desktop 7000 series cards in the first half of this year, and that brings us to today.
Launching today is AMD’s second new GPU for 2013 and the first GPU to make it to the retail desktop market: Bonaire. Bonaire in turn will be powering AMD’s first new retail desktop card for 2013, the Radeon HD 7790. With the 7790 AMD intends to fill the sometimes wide chasm in price and performance between their existing 7770 (Cape Verde) and 7850 (Pitcairn) products, and as a result today we’ll see just how Bonaire and the 7790 fit into the big picture for AMD’s 2013 plans.

AMD GPU Specification Comparison
AMD Radeon HD 7790 AMD Radeon HD 7850 AMD Radeon HD 7770 AMD Radeon HD 6870
Stream Processors 896 1024 640 1120
Texture Units 56 64 40 56
ROPs 16 32 16 32
Core Clock 1000MHz 860MHz 1000MHz 900MHz
Memory Clock 6GHz GDDR5 4.8GHz GDDR5 4.5GHz GDDR5 4.2GHz GDDR5
Memory Bus Width 128-bit 256-bit 128-bit 256-bit
VRAM 1GB 2GB 1GB 1GB
FP64 1/16 1/16 1/16 N/A
Transistor Count 2.08B 2.8B 1.5B 1.7B
Target Board Power ~85W 150W (TDP) ~80W 151W (TDP)
Manufacturing Process TSMC 28nm TSMC 28nm TSMC 28nm TSMC 40nm
Architecture GCN 1.1* GCN 1.0 GCN 1.0 VLIW5
Launch Date 03/22/2013 03/05/2012 02/15/2012 10/21/2010
Launch Price $149 $249 $159 $239

Diving right into things like always, Bonaire is designed to be an in-between GPU; something to go between the 10 Compute Unit Cape Verde GPU, and the 20 CU Pitcairn GPU. Pitcairn, as we might recall, is almost entirely twice the GPU that Cape Verde is. It has twice as many shaders, twice as many ROPs, twice as many geometry processors, and twice as wide a memory bus. Not surprisingly then, the performance gap between the two GPUs at similar clockspeeds approaches that two-fold difference, and even with binning and releasing products like the 7850 this leaves a fairly large gap in performance.

As AMD intends to carry the existing Southern Islands family forward into 2013, their strategy for the mid-to-low end of the desktop market has become one of filling in that gap. This is a move made particularly important for AMD due to the fact that NVIDIA’s GK106-powered GeForce GTX 650 Ti sits rather comfortably between AMD’s 7770 and 7850 in price and performance, robbing AMD of that market segment. Bonaire in turn will fill that gap, and the 7790 will be the flagship desktop Bonaire video card.

So what are we looking at for Bonaire and the 7790? As the 7790 will be a fully enabled Bonaire part, what we’ll be seeing with the 7790 today will be everything that Bonaire can offer. On the specification front we’re looking at 14 CUs, which breaks down to 896 stream processors paired with 56 texture units, giving Bonaire 40% more shading and texturing performance than Cape Verde. As a further change to the frontend, the number of geometry engines and command processors (ACEs) has been doubled compared to Cape Verde from 1 to 2 each, giving Bonaire the ability to process up to 2 primitives per clock instead of 1, bringing it up to parity with Pitcairn and Tahiti. Finally, the backend remains unchanged; like Cape Verde, Bonaire has 16 ROPs attached to a 128bit memory bus, giving it equal memory bandwidth and equal ROP throughput at equivalent clockspeeds.

Moving on to the 7790 in particular, the 7790 will be shipping at a familiar 1GHz, the same core clockspeed as the 7770. So all of those performance improvements due to increases in functional units translate straight through – compared to the 7770, the 7790 has 40% more theoretical compute/shading performance, 40% more texturing performance, 100% more geometry throughput, and no change in ROP throughput. Meanwhile in a move mirroring what AMD did with the 7970 GHz Edition last year, AMD has bumped up their memory clocks. 7790 will ship with a 6GHz memory clock thanks to a higher performing (i.e. not from Cape Verde) memory interface, which compared to the 7770’s very conservative 4.5GHz memory clock means that the 7790 will have 33% more memory bandwidth compared to 7770, despite the fact that the memory bus itself is no wider.

Putting it altogether, so as long as the 7790 is not ROP bottlenecked, it stands to be 33%-100% faster than the 7770. Or relative to 7850, the 7790 offers virtually all of the 7850’s texturing and shading performance (it’s actually 2% faster), while offering only around 60% of the memory bandwidth and ROP throughput.

On the power front, unsurprisingly power consumption has gone up a bit. As a reminder, AMD does not quote TDPs, but rather “typical board power”, which is AMD’s estimate for what power consumption will be like under an average workload. 7770’s official TBP is 80W, while 7790’s is 85W. We’ll have our own breakdown on this in our look at power, temperature, and noise, but it’s fair to say that 7790 draws only a small amount of additional power over the 7770. Ultimately this can be attributed to the fact that while Bonaire is a larger chip, it’s not extremely so, with only the addition of the CUs and additional geometry/ACE pipeline separating the two. Mixed with gradual improvements over the last year on TSMC’s 28nm process, and better power management from AMD, and it’s possible to make these kinds of small improvements while not pushing load power too much higher.

On the note of Bonaire versus Cape Verde, let’s also talk a bit about transistor count and die sizes. Unsurprisingly, Bonaire sits between Cape Verde and Pitcairn in transistor count and die size. Altogether Bonaire comes in at 2.08B transistors, occupying a 160mm2 die. This is as compared to Cape Verde’s 1.5B transistors and 123mm2 die size, or Pitcairn’s 2.8B transistors and 212mm2 die size. For AMD their closest chip in terms of die size in recent history would be Juniper, the workhorse of the Evergreen family and the Radeon HD 5770, which came in at 166mm2.

Moving on, as is consistent with AMD’s previous announcements, the 7790 is being launched as just that: the 7790. AMD has told us that they intend to keep the HD 7000 brand in retail this year due to the success of the brand, and to that end our first Bonaire card is a 7700 series card. The namespace collision is unfortunate – sticking with the 7000 series means AMD is facing the pigeonhole principle and has to put new GPUs in existing sub-series – but ultimately this is something AMD shouldn’t have any real problems executing on. We’ll get into the microarchitecture of Bonaire on our next page, but for gamers and other consumers Bonaire may as well be another member of the Southern Islands GPU family, so it fits in nicely in the 7000 series despite being from a new wave of GPUs.

With that in mind, let’s talk about product positioning and pricing. The 7790 will launch at $149, roughly in between the 7770 and the 7850. AMD will be positioning it as an entry-level 1080p graphics card, and though it’s a 7700 series part its closest competition in AMD’s product stack is more likely to be the 7850, which it’s closer to on the basis of both price and performance.

Against the competition, the 7790’s closest competition will be the GeForce GTX 650 Ti. However with the price of that card regularly falling to $130 and lower, the 7790 is effectively carving out a small niche for itself where it will be a bit ahead of the GTX 650 Ti in both performance and in price. NVIDIA’s next card up is the GTX 660, at more than $200.

For anyone looking to pick up a 7790 today, this is being launched ahead of actual product availability (likely to coincide with GDC 2013 next week). Cards will start showing up in the market on April 2nd, which is about a week and a half from now. Notably, AMD and their partners will be launching stock clocked and factory overclocked parts right away, and from what we’re being told factory overclocked cards will be prolific from day one. Overall we’re expecting this launch to be a lot like the launch of the GTX 560, where NVIDIA did something very similar. In which case we should see both stock and factory overclocked parts right away with more factory overclocked parts than stock parts, and if it does play out like the 560 then stock clocked cards would become a larger piece of the 7790 inventory later in the lifetime of the 7790.

Finally, AMD is wasting no time in extending their Never Settle Reloaded bundle to the 7790. As the 7790 is a cheaper card it won’t come with as many games as the more expensive Radeon cards, but for 7790 buyers they will be receiving a voucher for Bioshock Infinite with their cards. MSRPs/values are usually a poor way to look at the significance of game bundles, but it goes without saying that it’s not too often that $150 cards come with brand-new AAA games.

Spring 2013 GPU Pricing Comparison
AMD Price NVIDIA
$219 GeForce GTX 660
Radeon HD 7850 $179
Radeon HD 7790 $149
$134 GeForce GTX 650 Ti
Radeon HD 7770 $109 GeForce GTX 650
Radeon HD 7750 $99 GeForce GT 640

Read the full review @ AnandTech

DailyTech – AMD Acquires Cloud Server Maker SeaMicro for $334M USD

AMD’s heavily threaded Bulldozer, APUs, GCN are good fits for Seamicro’s compact cloud computing serversAdvanced Micro Devices, Inc. (AMD) has struggled mightily in the server market in recent years, seeing its market share fall from nearly 15 percent in 2007 to less than half that — roughly 6.5 percent in 2011.
I. AMD Server Division — In Need of a Turnaround
AMD can try to write off part of its struggles to rival Intel Corp. (INTC) using anti-competitive techniques to squelch its performance during its strong years in the middle of the last decade, a big part of the troubles have come due to AMD’s trailing die shrink timing, which has not improved since it spun off its fabs. While AMD finally dropped a new architecture (Bulldozer) in Sept. 2011, it disappointed in clock speeds and power performance — something that may be attributable to die shrinks. Difficulty getting to 32 nm may have left AMD with too little time to thoroughly test and refine the new cores.

Approximately 21.89 percent of AMD’s market share is tied up in its server sales, so clearly this is a major issue for the company and its shareholders. AMD desperately needed a new tactic. While allowing competitive interplay between Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Comp., Ltd. (TPE:2330) and GlobalFoundries in die shrinks may be a potential long term solution, AMD needed something more immediate.

That’s why the news of its acquisition of SeaMicro for $334M USD (a mix of $281M USD cash and stock) is a bit surprising, but a bit unsurprising. The small 80-person Silicon Valley server maker is known as a premium maker of highly dense and power-efficient servers. It sells heavily to large-scale cloud computing businesses.

AMD
AMD’s stock price is heavily dependent on server performance. [Image Source: Trefis]

II. Meet SeaMicro

The move is also a boon to Santa Clara, California manufacturer NBS. Unlike Apple, Inc. (AAPL), Hewlett-Packard Comp. (HPQ), Dell, Inc. (DELL) and others, SeaMicro doesn’t have its servers assembled by Chinese laborers working under sweatshop like conditions. It’s made in America, by blue collar workers earning a respectable living.

While it only spends a tenth of the research and development budget (~$50M USD per year) as Dell or HP, SeaMicro’s product is viewed as very competitive from a technology basis. But SeaMicro can work intimately with its American manufacturing partner, building prototypes, trialing optimizations, and working out bugs before production hits.

SeaMicro partner NBS
SeaMicro makes its servers in California — not China. It contracts NBS, a small local manufacturer (pictured). [Image Source: Ariel Zambelich/Wired]

All of this is good news for AMD; as SeaMicro’s strength in terms of power and density could offset its weaknesses in power performance, while accentuate its strengths in highly-threaded performance.

SeaMicro currently exclusively sells Intel-based servers — a mixture of Xeon (Sandy Bridge) based tightly-packed 10 RU designs and mixed 10 RU designs incorporating Intel Atom chips for lighter workloads. The Atom servers use the dual-core 64-bit Atom N570 chip (8.5W TDP). SeaMicro’s unique 10 RU form factor squeezes one to two tower racks into a single compact box-like form factor.

SeaMicro 10 RU
SeaMicro makes compact 10 RU “box” servers. [Image Source: SeaMicro]

AMD pledges — for now — to continue to make Intel-based SeaMicro servers. But it states that special AMD Opteron-based designs will be released before the end of the year.

SeaMicro claims four-fold power reduction and six-fold space reduction by eliminating the typical busy server chipset to just three chips, via proprietary interconnect technology.

SeaMicro server
SeaMicro’s server boards drastically slash space and power via custom chipsets.
[Image Source: SeaMicro]

The approach is rather different from the more traditional designs of SeaMicro’s primary competitors.

III. Folding in Piledriver, APUs, GCN GPUs, ARM into Thread-Shredding Beasts

In the long term this deal makes a lot of sense. AMD, given its scant stake (and given SeaMicro’s modest market share) can likely phase out Intel’s designs. In cloud workloads Bulldozer and its successor Piledriver could truly shine in the one area AMD currently beats Intel — thread performance.

Look at AMD’s Feb. 2012 roadmap, there were hints at the pending acquisition, which SeaMicro CEO Andrew Feldman says happened “unbelievably quickly.”
AMD Server roadmap

AMD could also drop in Hondo (ultra-low power) or Brazos 2.0 (low power) cores in 2012. Then in 2013 it can follow with Temash (ultra-low power) and Kabini (low power).
AMD consumer roadmap APUs and GPUs

The Brazos C-50 and C-60 chips already are on par with the N570 in a dual-cores performing at 9W, though they lag in clock speed (1.0 GHz). But recall, that these chips have a beefier GPU than Atom.

One possibility is that AMD may deliver variants of its low power cores without the GPU. Alternatively, once it can incorporate its new compute-friendly Graphics Core Next GPU architecture, it could use on-APU GPU computing to handle cloud workloads.

And AMD has stated it may even adopt ARM designs, which means that SeaMicro could be soon travelling down the road Dell and HP are currently exploring [1][2].

Assuming AMD explores these tracks thoroughly, its new subsidiary could soon be producing some sweet thread-shredding mixed designs.
Source: DailyTech.

DailyTech – Intel Shows 22nm 50-Core “Knights Corner” CPU

Over 1 TeraFLOPS on a single chip

22517_large_22513_large_KnightsCorner
GPGPU and cloud computing have been hot topics for the last several years. Intel has shown off several designs like Larrabee and the Single-chip Cloud Computer in the past. However, it is Knights Corner that will be the firm’s first commercial product to use the Many Integrated Core (MIC) architecture. The co-processor will be offered as a PCIe add-in board.

The MIC concept is simple: Use architecture specifically designed to process highly parallel workloads, but ensure compatibility with existing x86 programming models and tools.

This would give MIC co-processors the ability to run existing applications without the need to port the code to a new programming environment, theoretically allowing maximum CPU and co-processor performance simultaneously with existing x86 based applications. This would dramatically save time, cost and resources that would otherwise be needed to rewrite them to alternative proprietary languages.

AMD and NVIDIA have been trying to do with their latest architectures by enabling support for languages like C++, but Intel wants to challenge them in this potentially lucrative market.

Knights Corner will be manufactured using Intel’s latest 3-D Tri-Gate P1270 22nm transistor process and will feature more than 50 cores. Intel demonstrated first silicon of Knights Corner at the SC11 conference yesterday. The co-processor wowed the crowd by delivering more than 1 TeraFLOPS of double precision floating point performance.

The firm also touted its “commitment to delivering the most efficient and programming-friendly platform for highly parallel applications”, and showed off the benefits of the MIC architecture in weather modeling, tomography, protein folding, and advanced materials simulation at its booth.

There is no timeframe on when Knights Corner will enter production or be available to customers.
Source: DailyTech.

AMD FX Processor Product Brief


AMD FX Processors unlock maximum, unrestrained processing performance for extreme responsiveness you can see and feel.

Maximum Performance

  • The industry’s only 8-core desktop processor
  • Overclock with easy to use AMD Overdrive™ and AMD Catalyst Control Center™ software suites1
  • Supreme power available from virtually every core configuration – also available in 6- and 4-core variants
  • Aggressive performance for mega-tasking and intensive applications like video editing and 3D modeling

Innovative Architecture

  • The industry’s first and only native 8-core desktop processor for unmatched multitasking and pure core performance with all new “Bulldozer” architecture
  • New 32 nanometer die shrink designed to reduce leakage for improved efficiency, increased clock rate headroom and better thermals
  • Can deliver more cores and more performance without raising the power requirements

Industry Leading Price Per Performance

  • Unlocked processors allow the maximum tunable performance1
  • AMD Turbo CORE Technology dynamically adjusts performance to give you the best experience, no matter what you are doing
  • Get superior performance at a competitive price with unlocked technology1

AMD FX Processor Product Brief.

DailyTech – Intel, AMD Talk USB 3.0 Chipset Support

Intel support coming next year, AMD support much sooner

19479_usb3-sg
There are a number of notebooks on the market today that have USB 3.0 ports onboard. HP unveiled several new notebooks this week that that have USB 3.0 for example. However, all of the notebooks and desktops on the market today have to use a third-party USB 3.0 controller because AMD and Intel don’t support the standard natively. That is all about to change though.

AMD has announced that it has new chipsets that will be the first to integrated USB 3.0 support. AMD’s Phil Hughes told CNET News,“With [today’s] announcement AMD is…disclosing our support for SuperSpeed USB 3.0 in upcoming AMD A75 and A70M Fusion [chipsets]. Both chipsets are shipping today.”

It has taken long enough for major chipmakers to support USB 3.0 and with this announcement perhaps more companies will start to offer peripherals and gear that takes advantage of the port. There are some products on the market already that support USB 3.0, but nowhere near the vast and varied product types that use USB 2.0.

Analyst Brian O’Rourke from In-Stat said, “In order for the rippling effect to happen with USB 3.0 it has to hit in PCs and for it to hit in PCs it has to be integrated into the chipset. AMD is not Intel, but it’s probably the next best thing in chipsets.”  He continued saying, “The only peripheral devices with USB 3.0 out there right now are external hard drives and a few flash drives. Why? There aren’t any peripheral controllers for USB 3.0 in general release yet. Not any out there on the market yet.”

While AMD has its chipsets shipping already with support for USB 3.0, support from AMD rival Intel is still a ways off. Intel has been pushing support for Thunderbolt along with Apple and a few other companies. Thunderbolt is positioned by Intel as a complement to USB 3.0; not a replacement.

Intel has now announced that support for both USB 3.0 and Thunderbolt will come in the same chipsets sometime in 2012. Native support for Thunderbolt and USB 3.0 will land in the Intel Ivy Bridge chipset.

Intel currently offers support for USB 3.0 in some of its desktop mainboards, but that support comes by way of the NEC USB 3.0 chips.
Source: DailyTech.

AnandTech | Farewell to ATI, AMD to Retire the ATI Brand Later this Year

 

AnandTech | Farewell to ATI, AMD to Retire the ATI Brand Later this

Year.Four years ago AMD did the unthinkable: it announced the 5.4 billion dollar acquisition of ATI in a combination of cash and stock. What followed was a handful of very difficult years for AMD, an upward swing for ATI and the eventual spinoff of AMD’s manufacturing facilities to GlobalFoundries in order to remain profitable and competitive.

In the years post acquisition, many criticized AMD for blowing a lot of money on ATI and having little to show for it. Even I felt that for $5.4 billion AMD could’ve put together its own competent graphics and chipset teams.

Despite the protest and sideline evaluations, good has come from the acquisition. The most noticeable is the fact that AMD’s chipset business is the strongest it has ever been. AMD branded chipsets and integrated graphics are actually very good. And later this year, AMD will ship its first Fusion APUs (single die CPU/GPU): Ontario using Bobcat cores and an AMD GPU. Ontario will be the first tangible example of direct AMD/ATI collaboration since the acquisition.

Just as we’re about to see results from the acquisition AMD is announcing that it will retire the ATI brand later this year. Save those boxes guys, soon you won’t see an ATI logo on any product sold in the market.

The motivation behind the decision to retire the ATI brand comes from AMD’s own internal research. Unfortunately AMD isn’t sharing the details of this research, just the three major findings from it:

1) AMD brand preference triples when the person surveyed is aware of the ATI-AMD merger.
2) The AMD brand is viewed as stronger than ATI when compared to graphics competitors (presumably NVIDIA).
3) The Radeon and Fire Pro brands themselves (without ATI being attached to them) are very high as is.

The second point is really the justification for all of this. If AMD’s internal research is to be believed, AMD vs. NVIDIA is better from a marketing standpoint than ATI vs. NVIDIA. Honestly, AMD’s research seems believable. AMD has always seemed like a stronger brand to me than ATI. There’s little room for ego in business (despite it being flexed all too often) and I don’t believe AMD would hurt its marketing simply to satisfy any AMD executives – the research makes sense.

Meanwhile the third point is the realization that there are very few product lines with the ATI brand left. ATI’s chipset operations were quickly absorbed in to AMD and given appropriate naming, while ATI’s consumer electronics products such as their Digital TV division have been sold to other companies. Radeon and FirePro are the only two ATI product lines left, and both are strong brands on their own.

The brand switch also reflects some internal changes at AMD. Many important ATI employees have been relocated to AMD’s base of operations in Austin, Texas in order to help with Liano, Ontario, and AMD’s future Fusion products. So the line between AMD and ATI has been further blurring for some time.

The brand switch will start late this year, I’d guess in Q4 with Ontario and a new GPU release. AMD (and NVIDIA) originally had GPU designs for the 32nm process node however extensive teething problems with 40nm and 32nm forced TSMC to cancel the node and move directly to 28nm. This cancellation required both companies to redesign their parts to work within existing 40nm processes and move their original plans out to coincide with 28nm in 2011. As a result we will see an incremental update to the Radeon HD 5000 series at the end of this year, but don’t expect the sort of performance boost we got with the 5800 vs. 4800. This upcoming hardware will probably carry the AMD Radeon HD 6000 series brand. All existing hardware will continue to carry the ATI brand.

To go along with the new brand we get new logos. If OEMs want to display a badge without the AMD brand, there’s an alternative for that as well:

AMD states the AMD-less logos are purely at the request of OEMs who sell systems with Intel CPUs and AMD GPUs. I suspect Intel’s logo program may have some stipulations on being used adjacent to a sticker with an AMD logo on it, although AMD told me it was purely at the request of the OEMs trying to avoid confusion.

The other major change is AMD’s brand simplification at the retail level. Last year AMD introduced a new platform brand called Vision. If you buy a PC with all AMD components (CPU, chipset and GPU) it can carry a Vision logo (similar to Intel’s Centrino brand). There are four categories of Vision support all with increasing hardware requirements: Vision, Vision Premium, Vision Ultimate and Vision Black. The idea is that if you buy a standard Vision PC you’ll have a good entry level machine, but buying up the stack grants you additional capabilities and performance (e.g. Blu-ray playback, web cam support, discrete GPUs, multicore CPUs etc…). We’ve explained it all in greater detail here.

Starting next year, AMD’s Vision badge will be the only CPU brand you see on retail desktops/notebooks. You’ll still get Radeon/Fire Pro badges on systems that use those parts, but you’ll no longer see a Phenom II, Athlon II, Turion or Sempron logo on Vision systems. Instead you’ll see what CPU is inside on the little card that sits next to the system at your local retailer.

I suspect this will last until AMD introduces Bulldozer, at which point it’ll probably be very eager to build up its brand – assuming performance its is competitive.

Final Words

Retiring the ATI brand comes at an interesting time in the microprocessor market. Graphics is becoming much more important, but to date we have very few examples outside of 3D games as good consumer applications for powerful GPUs. AMD views this as the perfect time to consolidate its brands before the CPU/GPU line gets more blurry.

AMD also pointed out that its market share has been on a steady climb over the past few years. According to Mercury Research, AMD’s discrete GPUs climbed from ~33% marketshare at the end of 2007 to 51% last quarter. AMD has executed unusually well on the GPU side and NVIDIA has had some very difficult years in the process, both of which are responsible for AMD’s climb. The ATI name will go out on a high note.


AMD Discrete GPU Marketshare, Source: Mercury Research

If all goes well with AMD’s two exciting new CPU architectures next year, the brand will only get stronger going forward. Bobcat could do very well in today’s netbook/thin and light notebook form factors and Bulldozer may mark a return to competition in the server and high end desktop markets.

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